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not arrive in your lifetime. why do this because you're dead companion had lured you into science. in science is deliberate parenting. nonstop hurricane. according to the book in her lap, the first two rules are number one, the truth at any price, including the price of your life and number two, look at things as though you've never seen him before. then proceed from there. look at things that everyone takes for granted and then see what you learn. so the next big question will be more important than the next answer. new questions can produce scientific links. insights that nine years later, a guy we'll call for a pure and i'm sure. it becomes your mission. finding the question that will produce the next big perception. an unfolding this point that will allow others to radically pursue how did god get into the picture? the bar mitzvah is coming up in your 12 years old. your dad is going through a party for all the kids that you know, all the kids who humiliate you three quarters of a mile from your home. this time you are invited. yes, you are invited and this is the first time you will atten
. and now the question is, with running science in order to expand science which is what i have done, then okay, now the normal credentialing process to take it seriously. [inaudible] >> to bring everything back down a little bit to the pragmatic, i don't have a science background but i am a political science -- and i was struck with the wave in the comparison of it with the stock market which is hanging around in the back of my head, and i haven't read it yet but the idea of lots of discrete entities doing things, creating something larger with or without people, with or without that intention of creating something larger. is this already being done, to apply this to policy say you know okay we want to do this. we are doing it this way but it's not working or all of these actions we are taking are somehow creating this other thing that we haven't even thought about. i feel like there could he and education, sort of guide to how we would put recruitment strategies or how to use them as a tool in other fields? >> i think you're absolutely right in that is why had done this thing up di
honorary degrees, she's been the first of everything, ran the national science foundation, she was the -- >> nuclear regulatory commission. >> nuclear regulatory commission. and she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at mit. amazing. [applause] nancy-ann deparle is assistant to the president and the deputy chief of staff for the executive office of the white house. she's an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she's been called the health czar of america, the point guard overhauling the american health care system. how about that for a job? >> there you go. >> what a powerhouse right here. [applause] so we, actually, have a lot of brain power up here right now. [laughter] and i wonder, all of you could have done very different things. you really had a lot of choices. so i'd just love to hear you about how you ended up picking what you did. who wants to start? >> you have the -- >> no. >> i'm a failed violinist. of laugh -- [laughter] i was raised to be a musician, and my mother still asks me what happened. [laughter] but i was always interested in p
reproduction system. [laughter] a lecture by tied a can and a member of the house committee on science and technology is the guy than there was a theory that on me just was not a good candidate and did not connect very well and was somewhat awkward. remember when he went to michigan and said trees were the right to heighth. the actual quote was a love this state. it seems right that the trees are the right height. [laughter] away from here i find no trees in that please. no trees as such a perfect height as these. can never be at ease with trees that grow higher than one's knees or too high to splinter in the breeze. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i trie
and ph.d. from science from this institution, and a and philosophy from the hebrew university in jerusalem and a b.a. in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz, who i feel silly introducing these people would still, have to. norman paul ha'aretz served as editor-in-chief from commentary magazine from 1960 to 1995, and as the current editor-at-large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow with hudson institute, and he was a senior fellow and is the author of many books and articles including the bush doctrine, with the president said, and what it means in world war iv, the longest struggle against the islamofacism coming and why are jews liberals which for the new criterion is really entitled why are jews still liberals? she was a pulitzer prize scholar at columbia university where he earned his bachelor's of arts in 1950, and he also holds a bachelor's and master's degree from cambridge university england where she was a fulbright scholar and a fellow. in addition he has a bachelor's degree in hebr
.d. in political science from this institution, a master's in philosophy from the hebrew university of jerusalem and a d.a. in english literature from swarthmore college. i feel sort of silly introducing these people because everyone knows who they are, but still, i have to. serve as the editor in chief of commentary magazine from 1960- 1995, and is their current editor at large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow at the hudson's -- hudson institute and was a senior fellow and is the author of many books and articles, including the bush doctrine, what the president said, and what it means, world war four, the long struggle against islamic fascism, and why are jews liberals, which is a reviewer for the new criterion said should really have been titled, why are jews still liberals. he was a pulitzer prize scholar at columbia university where he earned his bachelor of arts in 1915, and he also holds a bachelor's and master's degree from cambridge university, england, where he was a fulbright scholar and a cut fellow. in addition he has a
that is what we try to challenge. a report card last year but also to look at math and science with high-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a
to everybody, and this is -- science shows us, you look at the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star, but imagine when you look up and see a star, think hundreds of billions of light years away, and many of the stars you are looking at are gone. they no longer exist, and the billion of years the light takes to get to you, the star is actually gone, but the energy and life is immuneble and goes on forever. people, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light of that body. that's who we are. we may have a finite time on earth, but every day, have a determination to burn as bright, warm, and brilliant as possible. that's the challenge. ultimately, the change makers are never the elected officials or the names read in history. this country has been fueled because of a conspiracy love. we don't know the names of the people, but they're the ones today that we benefit. i'll end, but my father, who i talk about in the book, had colorful things to say about me as i kid. he grew up in poverty, and i grew up in relative privilege. he said, boy, don't loo
colonialism, ending cartels, spreading the fruits of science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist because he was the leading spokesperson for black civil rights, and a leads spokesperson for women's rights and the conservatives said america's fascistses are those that thing wall street comes first and the american people come second. so he had enemies and the enemies wantedded to get rid of him. but he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in california, gallup released a poll asking voters who they want on the ticket. 65% said they wanted wallace, 2% said they wanted harry truman the question how were the party bosses going to -- roosevelt was feeble and when they party bosses come to him and want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says i want wallace but i can't fight this by myself. i i'm not strong enough, and he finally gave in, and it was table that he did. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with him. every one of the roosevelt kids was furious. they were huge w
on nonfiction selection. these titles were included in the "christian science monitor"'s 15 best books of 2012-nonfiction. >> for an extended list of links to various
. >> host: political science professor steven frantzich, the most recent book "oops: observing our politicians stumble," i had to double check that. how many books have you written? what's the topics? >> guest: well, this is 17 of original books, start counting the second editions, it's 27, but always lie with statistics. i started out all academic, time in the trenches, doing academic books, textbooks, last five or six books are more fun kinds of books. the one just prior to this, i did one called honored guests profiling all of the people, the presidents mentioned in the state of the union message. today, we're used to that, a president pointing up and using it somewhat as app example. that was not done until roomed reagan did it for the first, you know, for the first time, and every president since then used the people as an example of their political goals and their sorts of philosophies so i had fun with that one. close to home, i did a bigg of brian lamb. i did work, and they said what is the real brine lamb like? he did not want a biography done. i pumped him and pumped him,
. whatever, science, history, it's all going to be harder. maybe you can get through math without reading and maybe not. with the kids can't read well, some of them will not get through high school. if your kids can't read well, their choices and opportunities in life will be limited. they're not going to have as many choices. but the cool thing about books, the really terrific thing is that there are so many really good books out there for them to read. right here the at the book fair, there are a lot of looks that really absolutely -- to your kids. "harry potter," a turkic series, wimpy kids, terrific illustrations. books about sports. fine, if you have boys let them read anything. comic books, great, graphic novels, sports, almanacs certainly, cook books, why not? as long as they are reading because they will get better at it. who love soccer? yeah would love soccer. are you better now? how come? we play a lot. the same with reading. if you read more, you get better at it and it gets each year. you read better books. you have something that -- so i would love you all to get that into y
is an unabashed liberal but she is also on tv but she has a ph.d. in something, political science or something and charles murray would not want to be called a pundit. he is famous for controversy over the bell curve. this looks at white working-class to try to separate class from race which complicate everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class of gone down. there is this white elite adopted middle-class value, the working class lost those, a complex argument, advanced two places to describe these things. it is interesting, it is more than somebody ranting and raving. >> a scholar with the american enterprise institute as well, probably not fair to call him a political pundits. what about glen beck? he launched his own imprint, but his fox show is off the air. can you see the result of his sales? >> as far as i can tell glyn back, what he has been doing since he left fox has been trying to build a brand that reaches of very dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio show but a new site called the blaze and other things going on through his web
of standing at the intersection of the arts and sciences. whenever you see him to a product launch back in the period of the ipod, the ipad and the iphone de ended with a picture on the screen as the art, the liberal art street intersection with the scientist st.. and i realize there was a common theme with feinstein -- feinstein and benjamin franklin. it was a creativity is not necessarily just being smart, because those of you here probably know a lot of smart people coming and you know that smart people are dying of dozen. they don't amount to much but it's an innovative, creative and imaginative person who inset thinking different as steve what say and amounting to something in the bill was the common thread of the different people that i had written about so i got excited about a rare opportunity to be really up close to somebody that had transformed our world to be able to spend a day after day and hour after hour with him to be able to try to write a story that looked at creativity, innovation and beauty. so what i would like to do today i hope what we in louisiana call a little
and imperialism and the economic exploitation spreading the fruit of science and technology are not of the world and the southern segregationist was the leading spokesperson, the antifeminist because he was the leader in the human rights of the party and the entire imperialists and the conservatives that said america's fascists are acting king wall street comes first and the american people second so we had enemies and they wanted to get rid of him on that ticket in 1944 but the problem was he was enormously popular. 65% they want wallace on the ticket and 2% said they wanted. truman that the question is how were they going to thwart this. roosevelt when the party busses started to come to him and they want to get the rottweilers of the tickets, roosevelt says to him i support him but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough. i'm depending on you guys to do it and he finally caved in and it was terrible that he did. his family was furious. every single one of them were furious. there were huge wallace supporters and he had the backing of labor and the black delegates at the conv
there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in the eyes of
in the christian science monitor's 15 best books of 2012 nonfiction. in "reagan and thatcher: the difficult relationship," richard aldous, literary professor at bard college, argues that the relationship between former president ronald reagan and former british prime minister margaret thatcher was more tumultuous than they let the public believe. author renya grande in "the distance between us: a memoir." in "embers of war: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org, or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures o
: spelman college in atlanta and... c-span: in what subject? >> guest: in political science. and my master's and phd from harvard. c-span: and where are you getting your interest in political science along the way? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved ou
the sciences and humanities, which i don't think should be separated but often are, and let with other colleagues and researchers and create interesting collaborations. thank you so much. perhaps very appropriately, the great new zealand bibliographer donald francis mackenzie said if you know how to read it, every book is alive with the judgment of its maker. in the business of bibliography is learning how to read the human presences in every recorded task. and i think that we have certainly seen an example of how to recover those human judgments. those human presences through a capacious and db2 learned every article. he's he is the author of eight novels, two values in 10 volumes of essays in as many articles as some of our nations finest journals. a past deputy chairman of the national endowment for the humanities, he is the recipient of a national book critics circle award red the guggenheim and even a rock rockefeller award. when you think about his work in cytogenetics. i'm not entirely sure, but i'm sure that he can inform us about the nature of fiction, the book, and the future
she has a ph.d. in something. political science i think and i think charles murray would be gummy probably would not want to be called the pundit. he is famous for the controversy over the bell curve but this is a book that looks at the white working class and looked at the white working class to try to separate class from race which complicates everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class has gone down hill and there is this sort of white elite adopts a middle-class and sort of a complex argument. he goes to two places to describe these things. is inching and provocative book so more than someone is ranting and raving. >> host: and of course -- with the american enterprise institute so not fair to call him a political pundit. what about glenn beck? he launched his own imprint but his flock show is off the air. can you see the results in his sales? >> guest: as far as i can tell, glenn beck, what he has been doing since he left fox's has been really trying to build a brand that reaches a dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio sh
know science mismatch is a problem, that although blacks are more likely than whites to nature when they go to college, they're much less like you to get stem degrees, science engineering that degrees if they receive preference. university of virginia found to be taped to blacks or two students of any color, one who receives a preference, one who doesn't, the preference is a 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on this path through. mismatch also affects academic inclined students who receive much preferences for that to become university professors are going to academics someday. predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class in the side economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california were voters passed proposition 209 a large cause a natural experiment of what happens when preferences are banned from entire university system. the results aren't extremely curt for anyone who bothers to look. but then i have to nurse at implementation of research quality, the number of blacks in the university of california system
to be a lot tougher than it needs to be. whatever, science, history will all be harder. maybe you get to nap without reading and maybe not. if your kids can't read well, some of them will not get through high school. if your kids can't read well, choices and opportunities in life will be limited. they're not going to have as many choices. but the cool thing about looks, the great and terrific thing is there's so many really good books out there for them to read. there's a lot of books that will absolutely blow the minds of your kid. you know, harry potter, terrific series. when the kids come and terrific illustrations. books about sports, fine. if you have boys, let them read anything. , looks, great, graphic novels, almanacs, cut books, share, why not. as long as they are reading because to get better at it. i'll go to schools and say who play soccer? who love soccer? the outcome of the. you better know? would play a lot. same with reading. he read more, get better at it. it gets easier. you read better books. you have something that you love. so i though the will to get that in your hands
research has been done, published in excellent journals. so we now know that science mismatch is a pervasive problem. although blacks are more like listen than similar whites to want to major in science and engineering when they go to college, they're much less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study at the university of virginia found that if you take two blacks or two students of any color, one of whom receives a large presence, one whom momentum, the student who receives a preference has about a 0% larger -- 40% larger chance of dropping out on his way through. mismatch also accepts academically-inclined students who would like to go into academics someday but very predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class and decide that economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california where voters passed proposition 209, and we had a large quasi-natural experiment of what happens when racial preferences are banned from an entire university system. the results of prop 209 are ext
, should we think more about it. should we think more about the science about it. they are saying that we should spin off more great technology. it's another great competition. >> i love the change in mr. webb a year later. the president is basically asking, is this a top priority. and he said oh, absolutely. [laughter] >> i think he also asks how else it can be done. is there a way of doing this. perhaps this shifts from kennedy's own cold war. >> part of what i want to understand, if this meeting is taking place about a year and a half after the state of the union speech, here it is a year and a half later, and the government isn't really on board. and you think, my god. >> i can confirm that that is often the case. but the written document i've seen on display in this library, why is it being done right now? what we do in the next 24 hours. he really was on it. but i think it's worth pointing out that in 1963, which it was a very different year from 1962. but the cold war had calm down a big notch after the cuban missile crisis. and khrushchev and kennedy were working closely together
approach. i mean, it's not rocket science to see that we have a democratic senate, a republican house and a democratic president, and that's going to be the same starting january 3 of next year for at least two more years. so we know what we're dealing with, and i think it affects us right now in the fiscal cliff negotiations because we are not going to do anything unless it is bipartisan. we will not be able to pass anything in the house that doesn't have significant republican votes in the senate, and the democrats in the senate are not going to be able to support something that won't require some votes of democrats in the house. so we are together, maybe it's like a dysfunctional family, but we do have to work together because without bipartisanship, nothing is going anywhere. therefore, i think you have to go back to negotiations 101. which is that someone in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the other party in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the president is not going to get everything he wants. the republicans in the house and senate are not going to get
this freakish weather and all the sciences is so overwhelming about claimant count yet you don't see on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab by the scruff of the neck during her tenure at abc and say, we've got to cover this more? >> there were several. we would have discussions about. one of them was the environment and how we covered the environment. and every time we try to do a primetime special environment we wouldn't get a rating. that led, it's one of the chapters i write about, what i do not come across well. we had leonardo dicaprio india president clinton. we got killed for it. we did a primetime environmental special, and he was chairman of earth day that you and i thought he would just make an appearance. i got killed for. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment in a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more terrorism coverage than others did before 9/11. jon miller went in and interviewed bin laden, trekked into the mountains in afghanistan and interviewed him. we get a primeti
how far advanced they've been in the sciences. the chinese religion to today did flirt with communism for a number of years, but they turned it became capitalists because basically they are all from the cultures of creativity. so i agree with you. one which i forgot to mention was the cicada craze of the religion with christianity when the slaves went to the americas and found themselves being banned from studying and following their religion. they say yes master, we won't follow the old religion, but they just substituted the same for their deities. so until today you'll find shock of the, shall coup, one of the ceiling fan rbd at the candles, et cetera, et cetera. they went through that cicada craze and even evolved to mean simply created images of their deities and stylized mode so that they could claim that this figure stood for the same because that is how accomplished they were creating to human beings. until today you find this a credit freeze existing, but also there is another phase, which is very, very prominent, where there was a revolt that was christianity, go away. and t
of quotations spreading science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist, the antifeminist because he was the leader for women's rights women's rights in the anti-imperialist and can service. he said america's fascist think wall street comes first in the american people come second. he had enemies and those enemies wanted to get rid of him on the ticket. the problem was he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944 the night the convention starts the potential potus who they wanted on the ticket as vice president, 65% said they wanted wallace on the ticket in 2% wanted harry truman so the question where how worth it party bosses going to take to this? when they wanted to get wallace off the ticket roosevelt says to him my support wallace but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough and i'm depending on you to do it. they finally gave in and it was terrible that he did. his family was serious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with him. every single one of the roosevelt kids were furious with him. wallace had the backi
out of the equal protects clause that depends on social science evidence. and i think if the social science evidence is indeterminant, which it is, then we shouldn't be discriminating against people on the basis of race. >> roger, could i -- >> stuart -- >> quick point on s.t.e.m. grads. our point on s.t.e.m. grads isn't that we need more of them, maybe we do. our point is that when students, black or hispanic students go to college wanting to be s.t.e.m. majors, they should not be misled to go to colleges where they have very little chance of becoming s.t.e.m. majors. >> okay. the gentleman up here in the blue shirt. >> greg squires from george washington university. and previous board member of the woodstock institute where mr. sander was at for a while. i have a simple question for roger clegg. you gave us some numbers on the percentage of people born out of wedlock of various groups. what do you think accounts for those patterns? >> well, that's a very interesting question. and i'll tell you one thing that i think momentum account for it -- i think doesn't account for it. i don'
breakfast the washington correspondent for the christian science monitor. and he has this regular meeting with politically important people bunch of reports and stuff, and they raise the issue of the rumors of bill's philandering, and hilary says, i want you to know we have had trouble in our lives as married couples. we love each other. we believe in each other, i love my husband and we're going stay together for the rest of our lives. and they are blown away by her commitment. what they don't know and what neither of the clintons know it's a dress rehearsal. because nine months later when bill is soaring in the polls and almost on top of paul in new hampshire primary, the senator for massachusetts next door city, at the moment jennifer flowers says she's had a twelve-year love affair with bill clinton and has the tape recordings to prove it. hilary steps in immediately and takes over, and before you know it, they are doing a repeat of the breakfast only doing it on sixty minute after the super bowl, the largest tv viewing audience you can imagine and they are magnificent and hillary is
they normally wear. it was just like a science-fiction moment. it's like, what happened to all the men? i became curious about that. because i am a reporter, you know that once you get an idea in your head and you really can't let go. as a friend of this woman in the supermarket, her name was bethany, i bumped into her and started talking. i said, what's up? are you married? she was not married. though she had a daughter. and she began to talk to me about the guy was the father of her daughter and how -- she herself was working, she was going to school to become a nurse, she was raising a child and she began to talk about things in a disparaging way. which is well we don't live with calvin because he would be another mouth to feed. that was her argument. of course, she and i had a sisterhood bonding at that moment. but i wanted to know who calvin lies. so i got his phone number and calvin and i started at become friends. what happened to these men? what's going to happen to them? i don't know if you know that old ladies home journal column, can this marriage be saved, where you try to figure out
to continue to be the magnet for the intellectual property of the world. we want to be the science and technology ?oaftors -- innovators that will continue to fuel our economy. it's just how we get there that causes the disagreement. we have patriotic people who have been elected. i hope for the next two years we will put aside the partisan politics, put aside the thoughts of future elections, and try to solve the big issues of our time. because there's a lot of intelligence in this body, there's a lot of ability to come together. and i just keep the abiding faith that our messy democracy will, in fact, prevail because i can't think of going to anything else. and as long as we can function and show the world that we can govern as we disagree, that will be the example that will forever make our country the best and hopefully be a model for others to not think you have to take to the streets, not think that you need guns to have the government that you want but to show that peaceful transition can be done and also that we can have a lot of discussion, a lot of disagreements, but we c
the ied. we've wasted the science of dollars in counter ied technologies. you have some, but the last week to stop is to talk to the locals, to do so many patrols that they know you're coming through. in that debt during the surge we had these outposts all over the place. remember talking to one unit. when we come on a time, use war bombs are planted the night before. they are showing us. so we tend to look for technological solutions when we should not. the second thing is we tend to look at the upside of technology because for americans. we don't think about the consequences and i think there's a real pattern of consequences that we don't recognize. i was talking to some staff officers after the anaconda battle in the predator feed coming in during the battle and one colonel discussed discussed with her today, due to a predator free this? crack for generals. but it goes to a point, when you're not thinking strategically, when you're a general who strained his a battalion commander, who thinks the be-all and end-all is doing off the national training center, then if you don't bowhunter be
to become its director. he began at oxford in the junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on law and race in america. daniel walker and his history of america between 1815 and 1848. ladies and gentlemen, niko pfund. anna. >> thank you very much for coming here. for listening to us talk friday afternoon. i'm so that we chose to spend your afternoon with us. i have spent 10 years working for a library in and spent about half of that time physically working in a library. as a director of nyu press, i am thrilled to be here and to talk to you about publishing. i was asked to give you a quick overview of our philosophy. it sounds a little pretentious, but i would say that in terms of how i look at what we do, it is squarely driven by the message of oup. we often say that we don't exist to make money, but we do have to make money to do the things that we exist to do. it really doesn't want form all the work that we engage in. perso
got his ba in political science from the university of florida and m.a. and phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> the automobile industry. last night and he was stopping production of vx. the electors frequently, as solid and no satisfactory radio and television shows onto human kind. even norm has competed for the misquotations in any given year and multimedia. norm is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute for public policy research. he writes a column for roll call. he's written for every publication on the face of the earth. he and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, and "nightline" charlie rose. he has another heart and are coming ba, magna laude from university of minnesota and a phd from university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think tom and warm is so much attention the outlook piece is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that would make it not, there really must be something wron
of the arts in favor of science, in favor of technology but it strikes me that what you just said and the context of the book and the fact that we still have the sort of need for the untold stories for the dark secrets is indicative of a kind of historical illiteracilliterac y that exists in our country and that african-americans and that black history in africana history itself with the subject that is most unknown or he raced from our collective consciousness. do you think that historical illiteracy contributes to our present and even to our future? do you see the larger story that you tell here as essential to your vision of the country we ought to live in? >> i don't know that i have thought about it in that way. what i definitely thought about was how reflective her family was of the american story and i wanted very much to imbue it with the history so that people could see that her family had front row seats to some of the most important moments in our history slavery, civil war emancipation, the migration, jim crow, the depression and that all their steps forward and steps
religion, science, philosophy sports whether the in player got it right last week , whether or not the matter of dark matter will be discovered by micha physicist's rather than astrophysicists this is all a part of the speech and thought and believed that protected by the first amendment we can't think of it justin political as important as that is. and there is a third dimension in the speech that allows you to define your persona, your personality. your beliefs are who you are. and this is and the central human right. now, the supreme court and its first amendment cases have protected speech that is hideous. we only get those cases. [laughter] we had a case recently protecting speech videos where it was described to me. i never look at these things. women in spiked heels killing. those are in the protected speech. we protected speech when the day of the funeral, the servicemen killed in the elite. there were protesters using derogatory words about gay saying the military is when to be doomed to provision b
chair, had a governmental studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so wh
than politics. art, culture, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, whether or not the nature of dark matter is going to be first discovered by michael businesses rather than astrophysicists. this is all part of speech and thought that is protected by the first amendment. can't think of it just in political terms. then there's a third dimension, that speech is what allows you to define your persona and your personality. your speech, your thoughts, your belief, are who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment case has protected speech. that is habeas -- habeas. we only get those cases. [laughter] >> we had a case recently protecting speech, video where there was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spiked heels killing little animals. we protected that. it was protected speech. we protected speech on the day of a funeral of a servicemen killed in the middle east. there were protesters and using derogatory words about gays, saying that the military would be doomed because
's our representative of the disinvestment of humanity, arts in favor of commerce, science, technolog y. but what you just said and the context within need for the untold stories is indicative of the historical literacy that's black history is the subject that is most of known or erased from our collective consciousness. is that where literacy contributes to our future? the larger story is essential to your vision of the country we ought to live then. >> guest: i don't know. i thought about how reflective her family was of the american story. i wanted to to imbue with a history so people could see her family had front-row seats to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought
department of public safety to have a special agent from the eye or a division of investigation from science to investigate misconduct. the agent is conducting multiple investigations into the ballot fraud, voting by individuals who are ineligible and the double voting. since august of 2012 they have been filed in the conduct cases based on information received from my staff, the local election officials and members of the public. anyone who says voter fraud does not exist should like the numbers produced in the short months. we all know that criminal investigations take time and we expect more charges related to the misconduct to be filed in the coming months. in our efforts to insure integrity my office has taken several steps to maintain accurate voting lists in order to prevent people from taking advantage and election system. first, iowa has won numerous states participating in the project. the purpose of which is to identify voters that may be registered or voting in more than one state. second, i love match of the voting registration records with the social security administration mor
political affiliations accept the science behind climate change. yet congress refuses to act. there is a consensus among scientists somewhere around 98% -- i came the other day with a graph that showed -- it was a circular graph and the tiny little wedge of fringe dispute on this question is barely visible in the sea of agreement. and yet congress refuses to act. even after hearing from our national security officials about the dangers and threats from climate change, congress refuses to act. well, that refusal to act will have an impact on the american economy. a brookings report has found that well-designed climate legislation would increase investment, increase employment, and significantly increase america's gross domestic product. but here in congress, you're more likely to hear that any climate change legislation would hurt the economy and kill jobs. the opposite is true. we are missing opportunities to grow a clean economy that is manufacturing and export intensive and that creates the kind of jobs that support a strong american middle class. we are failing to protect
the country. >> that is a really great question and sort of as much political science as anything else. anything could big factor. i don't want to sound to nerdly, but the rise of computer-based redistrict teen, strangely enough, that the members of congress and state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few swing seats. we seen a bunch of change in the past couple election, but that's very much the exception rather than the rule. members of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear general elections by and large unless they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't explain the senate because you can't redistrict the senate, but it has had enormous impact at the state and state legislature level in the more polarized politics we have. i also think the news media plays a role in this. they used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news that everybody watched walter cronkite were hotly in brinkley and they sort of made up
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